Archive for the ‘Understanding Antisemitism 2: Stereotypes & Motifs’ Category

Understanding and Addressing

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

Understanding and Addressing the Nazi Card Download EISCA

Anti-Semitic Legends

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

D. L. Ashliman (2005). University of Pittsburgh.

The page presents extracts from several antisemitic legends as they appeared in medieval and post-medieval folklore.



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The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, Aum, and Antisemitism in Japan

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

David G. Goodman (2005). Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism (SISCA).

The author examines the implications of the appearance and popularity in Japan in the 1980s and 1990s of dozens of books based on the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, several of which suggested that the ‘Jewish plot’ had already succeeded in gaining control of America. The explanations of other commentators suggesting that the phenomenon could be understood either as sublimated anti-Americanism, as the legacy of the Japanese alliance with Nazi Germany in World War Two, as indicative of Japan’s complex history of imagining foreigners, or even as inverted feelings of kinship and admiration for Jews expressed as fear and envy are all discussed. By examining the origins of the Protocols and its history in Japan, he suggests that ultimately,  the consequences of its dissemination is to act as an enabling ideology for destruction.



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Medieval Sourcebook: Anti-Semitism

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Fordham University – Center for Medieval Studies.

Access is available to the reproduction of examples of medieval antisemitic legends and libels, and the contemporaneous documentation of key instances of medieval antisemitism. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts related to medieval and Byzantine history.



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On Blood Libels

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Anthony Julius (2006). Engage.

The author comprehensively documents and analyses the use of the Blood Libel myth against Jews from the 12th century to the present day. From its resonances with Christian charges of deicide through to its contemporary application to characterise Israelis and Zionists as child murderers, the ongoing story of this antisemitic defamation is chronicled.



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Common Themes and Aspects of Antisemitic Rhetoric

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

B’nai B’rith Anti-Defamation Commission (ADC).

A basic introduction to common themes in antisemitism is provided. Stereotyping, deicide, blood libel, the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, conspiracy, Holocaust denial, the Jewish/Nazi analogy, and the relationship between antisemitism and anti-Zionism are addressed.



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Antisemitic insults: a lexicon

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Jonathon Green (2007). Engage.

The author, a lexicographer, examines the history of the language used to refer to Jews, and the derivations created from the word ‘Jew’ that have appeared over time. The ability and manner in which vocabulary has been used to infer stereotypical and negative connotations are explored.



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About The Protocols of the Elders of Zion

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Gordon Fisher (2000). H-Antisemitism.

The website H-Antisemitism has reproduced the series of original articles from Philip Graves in The Times of London from 1921 that exposed the Protocols as a literary forgery.



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Protocols of the Elders of Zion

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Holocaust Encyclopedia. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

This entry from the Holocaust Encyclopedia of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum provides an introduction to the origins and perpetuation of this antisemitic forgery. Links for further research are provided.



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The Catholic Church and the Blood Libel Myth: A Complicated Story

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Massimo Introvigne (2007). Covenant.

The author traces the development of the Blood Libel Myth from antiquity to the present day against the backdrop of the Papal response to it. The significant role of the Vatican at several junctures in documenting the falsity of the Blood Libel myth and in prohibiting its promulgation is highlighted. Conversely, the silence of the hierarchy of the Catholic Church at other times, most notably between 1880 and 1905 is also addressed.



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